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Modulift White Paper Advises on Environment Policy

Posted on August 26, 2015


Modulift has published a white paper outlining the policy and documentation it uses to ensure the below-the-hook equipment supplier continues to raise the bar in green manufacturing. In the paper, which has been posted to the company’s website, the maker of spreader beams, lifting beams and other below-the-hook equipment, outlines the opportunities created by an increasingly green industrial environment.

Modulift references two documents in particular—ISO 14001:2004 and Article 4 of the revised EU Waste Directive (WFD 2008/98/EC)—as it guides readers through the directive’s waste hierarchy and environmental management systems as outlined by ISO.

Managing director Sarah Spivey said, “It would be a surprise nowadays for a customer or end user not to be aware of their environmental impact but many may not have considered the extent to which that is influenced by the products they consume. Others might be unfamiliar with the documentation available to help their operations become as green as possible.”

She added, “We penned the white paper to share the key points from two documents that we have used to guide our own policies and selection of the suppliers we use and hope it serves as a blueprint to others in our industry and those looking to be greener in other sectors.”

The Waste Directive hierarchy, for example, illustrates the order of priority companies should apply when making decisions about the resources used and the waste generated by a business. It also stresses the need to reduce the quantity of waste by reusing or extending the lifespan of products.

Modulift uses modular configuration as an example of the reusability of its equipment that, it suggests, could be applied by other sectors. Owing to the interchangeability of Modulift’s products, spreader beams of varying spans and capacities can be assembled and used. ‘How might this benefit be replicated in your business?’ the white paper asks.

“Having suppliers committed to the same environmental objectives is absolutely key,” said Spivey. “Our main sub-contract manufacturer has invested in both a biomass heating system and a large solar panel installation that not only has the capacity to power their entire factory but also allows them to be a net exporter of electricity to the National Grid. Working closely with our suppliers has meant that improvements such as lean manufacturing practices have been implemented which in turn has resulted in a reduction of obvious waste streams and a decrease in waste materials and energy usage.”